HP Third Generation Latex Printer

Our new HP Latex 335 Printer is a top-of-the range printer for graphics and signage. Using HP’s Third Generation (latest) Latex Inks, the printer deliver crisp images, bright and vivid colours, and can print on a myriad of substrates and media. With a printing width of 1.63m (64″), we can deliver anything from the smallest print to large prints in a very fast turnaround time.

Unlike solvent based inks, HP Latex Inks are water based. The prints are odourless and can be installed anywhere, including nurseries, hospitals, museums, etc. providing a safe, odourless and chemical free environment right from installation. HP Latex inks can go where ECO Solvent inks cannot! This is backed by a number of certifications that HP Latex Inks carry, among which are:

 

The advantage of the Third Generation Latex Inks however doesn’t stop here. HP Third Generation Inks are industry leaders in Light-fade resistance, Scratch and Abrasion Resistance, and Water and Chemical Resistance, as shown below:

 

HP Third Generation Latex Inks offer best-in-class Light Fade Resistance. 

Light-fade resistance, sometimes referred to as print permanence, is a measure of how well a print resists fading with exposure to light and other environmental factors such as ozone. The color of an ink comes from its dyes or pigments, and over time these particles will be broken down by UV rays in sunlight, resulting in colors that fade. Prints produced with inks that contain pigments, such as HP Latex Inks, tend to last longer than prints produced with inks that contain dyes, but nonetheless they will start to fade over time depending on the intensity of UV light exposure.

Since the amount of UV light varies greatly between different locations, HP tests light-fade resistance in three different conditions which represent typical display locations for wide-format graphics:

This table shows the expected life of prints produced with HP Third Generation Latex Inks on different media types and in different display environments based on internal testing by the HP Image Performance Lab:

 

Scratch and Abrasion Resistance

Scratch resistance and abrasion resistance refer to the ability of a print to resist damage from different objects with which it comes into contact. This is a relevant consideration during the finishing, shipping, and installation of a graphic, as well as once it is in its final display position.

Scratch damage refers specifically to damage from sharp or pointed objects—fingernails, for example. This is a very important consideration for high-value prints that will be viewed at short distance, since a single scratch can occur in an instant and permanently damage a print.

Abrasion (also called dry rub) refers to damage caused by repeated rubbing in the same location. This is an important consideration for mid-to long-term graphics that will be exposed to repeated rubbing or scuffing in the same location. For example, graphics applied to the doors of buildings or vehicles will require high abrasion resistance due to repeated touching and pushing around areas with handles.

HP tests scratch and abrasion resistance using a Taber tester (Figure 1) and according to industry-standard test methods.

 

Water and Chemical Resistance:

Water resistance and chemical resistance refer to the ability of a graphic to resist water, cleaning products, and other chemicals with which it may come into contact. For example, graphics in some indoor locations may be occasionally cleaned with water and indoor detergents. Vehicle graphics may come into contact with vehicle fuels, especially in the area of the fuel filling cap.

To test performance in this area, HP performs wet rub testing with water, as well as three common cleaning and chemical products—Windex® window cleaner, ethanol, and isopropyl alcohol.

This table shows the scratch, abrasion, water, and chemical resistance of each of the three generations of HP Latex Inks when printed on self-adhesive vinyl:

The addition of an anti-scratch agent to the third-generation HP Latex Inks provides a high level of scratch resistance on smooth, uncoated media—scratch resistance of HP 831/871/881/891 Latex Inks is higher than competitor eco-solvent inks and comparable to hard solvent inks on self-adhesive vinyl and PVC banner (Figure 2).8
This high level of scratch resistance significantly reduces the risk of accidental damage during the finishing, installation, and display of unlaminated graphics compared to previous HP Latex Inks and competitor eco-solvent inks.

 

 

Notes:

  1. Display permanence is tested according to SAE J2527 in a vertical display orientation in simulated nominal outdoor display conditions for select high and low climates, including exposure to direct sunlight and water. The HP Image Permanence Lab complements lab testing with field testing, placing print samples in real-life conditions at multiple test sites to account for a range of environmental conditions.
  2. HP in-window test data is generated using Xenon-Arc illuminant and assumes 6,000 Lux/12 hr day.
  3. Display permanence is tested according to SAE J2527 in a vertical display orientation in simulated nominal outdoor display conditions for select high and low climates, including exposure to direct sunlight and water. The HP Image Permanence Lab complements lab testing with field testing, placing print samples in real-life conditions at multiple test sites to account for a range of environmental conditions.
  4. HP in-window test data is generated using Xenon-Arc illuminant and assumes 6,000 Lux/12 hr day.
  5. Scratch resistance is measured according to test method ISO 1518-2:2011. Abrasion resistance is tested according to ASTM F1571-95 (2008).